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Introducing the One-Sentence Lesson Plan

In this guest post, I reveal my popular technique to help professors boil down their lesson into one focused sentence. This will forever change the way you plan.

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by Norman Eng in Uncategorized
October 15, 2017 10 comments

Professors, if you’ve been too busy to plan lectures, I have one solution called the ONE-SENTENCE LESSON PLAN. Read my guest post on Cult of Pedagogy.

Thoughts? Would love to know if it helps.

10 Comments
  1. Ernema Boettner says:

    Yes, thank you. Will watch your free videos. I teach at a career-technical school and have juniors and seniors.

    1. Norman Eng says:

      Great to hear!

  2. Fatima says:

    I think the one sentence lesson plan has ALOT of potential. Love the reference to Sinek as he’s really into the WHY thing. Will try it for my next lecture!

    1. Norman Eng says:

      Let me know how it works out!

  3. Eugene Matthews says:

    I think the prompts are brilliant! “Students will be able to…” I use something similar when teaching students how to create a research title, problem statement, or purpose statement.
    The formula is simple and hard to get wrong! I’m already re-planning today’s lesson!

    Btw are you familiar with Chip Conley’s Emotional Equations: Simple Truths for Creating Happiness + Success
    He applies a similar simple formulaic process to deconstruct various emotions. It’s absolutely worth checking out.

    Thanks for your insights!

    1. Norman Eng says:

      Hi Eugene! Glad to hear. I’ve heard of Chip but haven’t read the book. Sounds interesting!

  4. Karen says:

    During an observation today, I posted the one sentence lesson plan to my podium to help me stay focused. I will be using this technique again.

    1. Norman Eng says:

      Love it!

  5. Peter Kanetis says:

    Great post, great advice! Thank you, Dr. Eng! Quick question: Do you think there is any advantage to sharing (or not sharing) this strategy with your students–that is, to explain to them what the one-sentence lesson plan is, and why you’re doing it?

    (I hope I’m making sense!)

    1. Norman Eng says:

      Peter, I know that teachers (esp in the primary and secondary level) often share the lesson objectives (which is similar to the 1SLP)–sometimes even explicitly on the board–with their students. I have nothing against sharing it, but I do caution against drilling it into them (some schools force students to recite the lesson objective everyday).

      I definitely would bring up the three elements of the 1SLP at appropriate points. For me, however, I see the one-sentence lesson plan more for planning purposes than anything else. I’d rather turn it into a student-friendly question that pushes them to think of answers. Hope that makes sense!

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7 PROVEN STEPS TO PLANNING, TEACHING, & ENGAGING YOUR STUDENTS

A Quick-Start Guide

GET IT NOW